01-08-15

When sex abuse can lead to murder - The Guardian (1)

manuel schadwald 3.jpg

When sex abuse can lead to murder

Award-winning journalist Nick Davies concludes a series looking at the evils of paedophilia by confronting the grim mysteries of snuff movies. Today: The Amsterdam connection

Special report: child protection

Nick Davies

Monday 27 November 2000

A year after Bristol detectives finally started to unravel the ring of paedophiles who had been abusing children there for up to 20 years, they found an informant with an alarming story. The man, whom we will call Terry, had a long history of sexually abusing boys. He did not come from Bristol but, by chance, he had come across some of the paedophiles the detectives were investigating - in Amsterdam, where he said they had become involved with a group of exiled British child abusers who had succeeded in commercialising their sexual obsession. The exiled paedophiles were trafficking boys from other countries; running legitimate gay brothels and selling under-aged boys "under the counter"; they had branched out into the production of child pornography. And they had killed some of them. One boy had simply been shot through the head, Terry said: he had been causing trouble and had been executed in front of several pae dophiles. Another, he believed, had been thrown into one of the canals. But the one about whom he spoke the most was a boy who had been tortured and killed in the most painful fashion in the course of producing a pornographic video.

Terry said he had seen most of the video himself and had vomited before he could reach the end. The few detectives who specialise in the investigation of child abuse invariably say the same thing about "snuff" movies: they have often heard of them, sometimes pursued them but never found one. The videos remain one of the great unsolved mysteries of the burgeoning underworld of international sexual exploitation.

Twice told tale

Terry's account was so hideous as to invite disbelief. It was clearly possible that he was inventing the story in an attempt to curry favour with the detectives as they turned over Bristol's paedophile subculture. And yet the detectives discovered that the allegation had been made before.

Not just once but repeatedly, evidence had come to the attention of police in England and the Netherlands, that, for pleasure and profit, some of the exiled paedophiles in Amsterdam had mur dered boys in front of the camera. Some of the evidence had been pursued. Some of it had been ignored. None of it had led to a murder charge. For a short while, the Bristol detectives thought they might be able to make progress in tracking down the truth; but when two of them flew to Amsterdam in the autumn of 1998 to pass on their information to Dutch officers, they hit a wall.

Terry had described the flat in Amsterdam where he had seen the video; he had named the owner of the flat who was, by implication, also owner of the video; he had provided the name of the man who carried out the killing; he had described events on the video in detail; he had provided the approximate age and the first name of the dead boy.

Dutch police said it was not enough: without the full name of a victim, they would not begin an investigation. Having fought their way through the swamp of inertia which surrounds British policing and prosecution of child abuse, the Bristol detectives had now hit the deeper swamp of virtual paralysis that afflicts its international policing. Within their own jurisdictions, there are now specialist paedophilia detectives - for example, in London and Amsterdam - who will work relentlessly to lock up predatory child abusers.

But when they try to move abroad, the potentially powerful machine starts to misfire. The result is that there is now a flourishing underground trade in boys who are being exported from the economic chaos of eastern Europe, as well as from the streets of London, to be put to work in the sex industry of western Europe. And no effective police operation to deal with it.

Predatory paedophiles cross whatever borders they like in order to pursue their obsessions; the police who might follow them are almost always trapped within their own narrow jurisdictions, partly by differences in law and procedure, partly because they lack the manpower and money to work internationally. There is an exception to this rule of parochialism, in the highly funded war against drugs, but in the perverse world of modern policing, the trafficking, rape and alleged murder of children has a far lower priority.

We have uncovered an international paedophile ring whose roots spring from Amsterdam, where, in the late 1980s, a group of British paedophiles set up a colony, exploiting the freedom of the city's gay community as cover to make a business of their fantasies.

Legal front

One of the first to do so was Alan Williams, the "Welsh Witch", who already had a vicious history of abusing boys in south Wales. Williams arrived in Amsterdam in 1988, aged 21, and soon set himself up as the manager of a gay brothel called Boys Club 21 at 21 Spuistraat, near the central station. Across the road at number 44, another British paedophile, a chubby Londoner named Warwick Spinks, then aged 25, was running a similar club called the Gay Palace. Both clubs had a legal business, running a bar and offering the services of adult male prostitutes.

But Williams and Spinks had much crueller interests. Williams had fled to the Netherlands after being convicted in Britain of indecent assaults on boys. In Amsterdam, he boasted of the day in south Wales when he had seen a 10-year-old boy on his bike, grabbed him, raped him, and, when he cried, strangled him. From Boys Clubs 21, he organised the importing of boys from Cardiff and London, inflicting intense violence on any who defied him.

Spinks had been running a mail order pornography business from Brighton, before he moved to Amsterdam, where he pioneered the trafficking of boys as young as 10 - first, from the streets of London, and, after the collapse of the Soviet Union, from the poverty of eastern Europe. Having brought them to Amsterdam, he used these "chickens" himself, sold them into the brothels or through escort agencies and put them in front of the camera. Some resisted, some ran away, but most were made to comply through the removal of their passports and doses of drugs and violence.

By 1990, these two clubs on Spuistraat, together with Boys for Men, De Boys, the Blue Boy and the Why Not, had become the busiest watering holes in the international paedophile jungle. Dutch police estimated there were 250 paedophiles involved in the production of child pornography in Amsterdam with an unknown floating population of child sex tourists from all over the world - and it was the British who formed the hard core consumers: Stephen Smith, who had helped to found the Paedophile Information Exchange, fled there when police in England prosecuted the organisation; Russell Tricker, now 58, a former private school teacher who was convicted of child sex offences in the UK, used his job as a coach driver to ferry suitable boys from London; John Broomhall opened a porn shop on Spuistraat and was caught with more than 1,000 copies of videos of under-aged boys; Mark Enfield, now 41, sold a video of himself abusing a drugged boy.

Alan Williams introduced two paedophile friends from Wales, John Gay and Lee Tucker, both of whom were to become central targets for Bristol detectives. The two men found they could sell Welsh boys into the clubs on Spuistraat and then make more money by investing in child pornography. They bought video equipment, set up TAG Films, and visited Amsterdam regularly to make films, which they sold through distributors in the US and Germany. At the time, Dutch law punished production of child pornography with a maximum sentence of only three months.

By October 1990, detectives on the old obscene publications squad at Scotland Yard were picking up worrying signals. An informant told them that someone called Alan Williams was trafficking boys into Amsterdam and that Williams had asked him to smuggle a child porn video back into the UK. Another informant told how he had smuggled a dozen tapes in the opposite direction: they had been produced, he believed, in north London, equipped with a bondage room for boys. He had delivered the tapes in Amsterdam to "Alan from Cardiff" at Boys Club 21. The informant said he had visited the Gay Palace across the road, where he watched videos of boys in bondage, aged 11 to 14, being buggered by masked men.

Soon, other informants were offering more detail. One man said he had seen Warwick Spinks selling a special video for £4,000. It showed a boy whom he thought was only eight or nine being sexually abused and tortured by two men. But the most startling allegations came from a gay man, "Frank", who had gone to Amsterdam in July 1990 and found himself caught up in this paedophile underworld. In 1993, he spoke to the same officers at Scotland Yard.

Frank told police that Warwick Spinks had invited him to come on a trip to the Canaries, where he had suggested Frank should help him sell videos and showed him a sample. Frank said he watched in growing horror as the video played out a murder - a boy who seemed to be no older than 12 was beaten and attacked with needles, before being castrated and cut open with a knife. The video seemed to have been shot in a barn, and detectives later learned that Williams and his friends had been talking about making a video in a barn that belonged to a German from one of the Spuistraat clubs.

Scotland Yard was in a difficult position: the informants were British and so was Spinks, who by this time had left Amsterdam and was living in Hastings, East Sussex. But everything else in the story was scattered round Europe. After long negotiations within Scotland Yard and with their counterparts in the Netherlands, the detectives set up Operation Framework, and, as the Guardian reported in 1997, they recruited an undercover officer to pose as a child abuser and befriend Warwick Spinks in England.

In a series of meetings, Spinks described how he picked up boys in Dresden, in Bratislava in the Czech Republic, and in Poland, where, he claimed, they cost only 10p. The undercover officer asked Spinks if he could get him a sado-masochistic video featuring boys as young as 10, and Spinks replied that he knew people in Amsterdam who could: "I know, well I knew, some people who were involved in making snuff movies and how they did it was, they only sold them in limited editions, made 10 copies or something, 10 very rich customers in America, who paid $5,000 each or something like that".

Spinks divulged no more about the video and failed to produce a copy of it. Without more evidence, Scotland Yard could not justify the expense of keeping the undercover officer or of sending officers to Amsterdam, where, in any event, they lacked police powers. They arrested Spinks in Hastings and charged him with adbucting and raping two homeless boys from the streets of London and selling one of them into a Spuistraat brothel. He was jailed for five years. But the allegation of murder would not go away. As the Guardian reported in 1997, another gay man, Edward, claimed to have seen five Amsterdam videos, each featuring the sexual torture and death of a boy. Dutch police investigated and said they could find no evidence.

Now, Terry had offered the Bristol detectives more evidence about life on Spuistraat. He explained how John Gay and Lee Tucker set themselves up as video pornographers, first taking a group of boys to an isolated farmhouse in France, and then making visits to Amsterdam to film with the boys there. And dealing with snuff movies he told how, in 1989, he had been alone in a flat which belonged to one of the key figures in the Amsterdam paedophile scene, whom he named; he had found a video and watched as it played out a murder - a boy was beaten before being castrated and cut open with a knife.

At first sight, Terry might have been describing the video Frank saw but its details differ: Frank described a video shot in a barn; Terry says his was shot in a flat. Frank described the abuse and murder of one boy; Terry says there was a second boy, who was also being abused and who was alive at the point he turned off the tape. And yet, the overlap is striking: the specific nature of the violence is identical; and Terry names the man who actually committed the killing - he is the same German whose barn was allegedly picked as a porn studio by the child porngraphers.

Terry, Frank, Edward and Spinks certainly mixed with the paedophile colony in Amsterdam in 1989/90 and all four separately claim at least one boy was killed on video. Spinks told the undercover officer that a German boy was killed; Frank says Spinks once hinted to him that a German boy named Manny had been murdered; we have confirmed from talking to boys who worked in Spuistraat at the time that a boy of that name and nationality, then 14, did disappear. Terry, however, says he thinks the victim of the video which he saw was Dutch, named Marco and probably 16.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2000/nov/27/childprotection.uk

When sex abuse can lead to murder - The Guardian (1)

manuel schadwald 3.jpg

When sex abuse can lead to murder

Award-winning journalist Nick Davies concludes a series looking at the evils of paedophilia by confronting the grim mysteries of snuff movies. Today: The Amsterdam connection

Special report: child protection

Nick Davies

Monday 27 November 2000

A year after Bristol detectives finally started to unravel the ring of paedophiles who had been abusing children there for up to 20 years, they found an informant with an alarming story. The man, whom we will call Terry, had a long history of sexually abusing boys. He did not come from Bristol but, by chance, he had come across some of the paedophiles the detectives were investigating - in Amsterdam, where he said they had become involved with a group of exiled British child abusers who had succeeded in commercialising their sexual obsession. The exiled paedophiles were trafficking boys from other countries; running legitimate gay brothels and selling under-aged boys "under the counter"; they had branched out into the production of child pornography. And they had killed some of them. One boy had simply been shot through the head, Terry said: he had been causing trouble and had been executed in front of several pae dophiles. Another, he believed, had been thrown into one of the canals. But the one about whom he spoke the most was a boy who had been tortured and killed in the most painful fashion in the course of producing a pornographic video.

Terry said he had seen most of the video himself and had vomited before he could reach the end. The few detectives who specialise in the investigation of child abuse invariably say the same thing about "snuff" movies: they have often heard of them, sometimes pursued them but never found one. The videos remain one of the great unsolved mysteries of the burgeoning underworld of international sexual exploitation.

Twice told tale

Terry's account was so hideous as to invite disbelief. It was clearly possible that he was inventing the story in an attempt to curry favour with the detectives as they turned over Bristol's paedophile subculture. And yet the detectives discovered that the allegation had been made before.

Not just once but repeatedly, evidence had come to the attention of police in England and the Netherlands, that, for pleasure and profit, some of the exiled paedophiles in Amsterdam had mur dered boys in front of the camera. Some of the evidence had been pursued. Some of it had been ignored. None of it had led to a murder charge. For a short while, the Bristol detectives thought they might be able to make progress in tracking down the truth; but when two of them flew to Amsterdam in the autumn of 1998 to pass on their information to Dutch officers, they hit a wall.

Terry had described the flat in Amsterdam where he had seen the video; he had named the owner of the flat who was, by implication, also owner of the video; he had provided the name of the man who carried out the killing; he had described events on the video in detail; he had provided the approximate age and the first name of the dead boy.

Dutch police said it was not enough: without the full name of a victim, they would not begin an investigation. Having fought their way through the swamp of inertia which surrounds British policing and prosecution of child abuse, the Bristol detectives had now hit the deeper swamp of virtual paralysis that afflicts its international policing. Within their own jurisdictions, there are now specialist paedophilia detectives - for example, in London and Amsterdam - who will work relentlessly to lock up predatory child abusers.

But when they try to move abroad, the potentially powerful machine starts to misfire. The result is that there is now a flourishing underground trade in boys who are being exported from the economic chaos of eastern Europe, as well as from the streets of London, to be put to work in the sex industry of western Europe. And no effective police operation to deal with it.

Predatory paedophiles cross whatever borders they like in order to pursue their obsessions; the police who might follow them are almost always trapped within their own narrow jurisdictions, partly by differences in law and procedure, partly because they lack the manpower and money to work internationally. There is an exception to this rule of parochialism, in the highly funded war against drugs, but in the perverse world of modern policing, the trafficking, rape and alleged murder of children has a far lower priority.

We have uncovered an international paedophile ring whose roots spring from Amsterdam, where, in the late 1980s, a group of British paedophiles set up a colony, exploiting the freedom of the city's gay community as cover to make a business of their fantasies.

Legal front

One of the first to do so was Alan Williams, the "Welsh Witch", who already had a vicious history of abusing boys in south Wales. Williams arrived in Amsterdam in 1988, aged 21, and soon set himself up as the manager of a gay brothel called Boys Club 21 at 21 Spuistraat, near the central station. Across the road at number 44, another British paedophile, a chubby Londoner named Warwick Spinks, then aged 25, was running a similar club called the Gay Palace. Both clubs had a legal business, running a bar and offering the services of adult male prostitutes.

But Williams and Spinks had much crueller interests. Williams had fled to the Netherlands after being convicted in Britain of indecent assaults on boys. In Amsterdam, he boasted of the day in south Wales when he had seen a 10-year-old boy on his bike, grabbed him, raped him, and, when he cried, strangled him. From Boys Clubs 21, he organised the importing of boys from Cardiff and London, inflicting intense violence on any who defied him.

Spinks had been running a mail order pornography business from Brighton, before he moved to Amsterdam, where he pioneered the trafficking of boys as young as 10 - first, from the streets of London, and, after the collapse of the Soviet Union, from the poverty of eastern Europe. Having brought them to Amsterdam, he used these "chickens" himself, sold them into the brothels or through escort agencies and put them in front of the camera. Some resisted, some ran away, but most were made to comply through the removal of their passports and doses of drugs and violence.

By 1990, these two clubs on Spuistraat, together with Boys for Men, De Boys, the Blue Boy and the Why Not, had become the busiest watering holes in the international paedophile jungle. Dutch police estimated there were 250 paedophiles involved in the production of child pornography in Amsterdam with an unknown floating population of child sex tourists from all over the world - and it was the British who formed the hard core consumers: Stephen Smith, who had helped to found the Paedophile Information Exchange, fled there when police in England prosecuted the organisation; Russell Tricker, now 58, a former private school teacher who was convicted of child sex offences in the UK, used his job as a coach driver to ferry suitable boys from London; John Broomhall opened a porn shop on Spuistraat and was caught with more than 1,000 copies of videos of under-aged boys; Mark Enfield, now 41, sold a video of himself abusing a drugged boy.

Alan Williams introduced two paedophile friends from Wales, John Gay and Lee Tucker, both of whom were to become central targets for Bristol detectives. The two men found they could sell Welsh boys into the clubs on Spuistraat and then make more money by investing in child pornography. They bought video equipment, set up TAG Films, and visited Amsterdam regularly to make films, which they sold through distributors in the US and Germany. At the time, Dutch law punished production of child pornography with a maximum sentence of only three months.

By October 1990, detectives on the old obscene publications squad at Scotland Yard were picking up worrying signals. An informant told them that someone called Alan Williams was trafficking boys into Amsterdam and that Williams had asked him to smuggle a child porn video back into the UK. Another informant told how he had smuggled a dozen tapes in the opposite direction: they had been produced, he believed, in north London, equipped with a bondage room for boys. He had delivered the tapes in Amsterdam to "Alan from Cardiff" at Boys Club 21. The informant said he had visited the Gay Palace across the road, where he watched videos of boys in bondage, aged 11 to 14, being buggered by masked men.

Soon, other informants were offering more detail. One man said he had seen Warwick Spinks selling a special video for £4,000. It showed a boy whom he thought was only eight or nine being sexually abused and tortured by two men. But the most startling allegations came from a gay man, "Frank", who had gone to Amsterdam in July 1990 and found himself caught up in this paedophile underworld. In 1993, he spoke to the same officers at Scotland Yard.

Frank told police that Warwick Spinks had invited him to come on a trip to the Canaries, where he had suggested Frank should help him sell videos and showed him a sample. Frank said he watched in growing horror as the video played out a murder - a boy who seemed to be no older than 12 was beaten and attacked with needles, before being castrated and cut open with a knife. The video seemed to have been shot in a barn, and detectives later learned that Williams and his friends had been talking about making a video in a barn that belonged to a German from one of the Spuistraat clubs.

Scotland Yard was in a difficult position: the informants were British and so was Spinks, who by this time had left Amsterdam and was living in Hastings, East Sussex. But everything else in the story was scattered round Europe. After long negotiations within Scotland Yard and with their counterparts in the Netherlands, the detectives set up Operation Framework, and, as the Guardian reported in 1997, they recruited an undercover officer to pose as a child abuser and befriend Warwick Spinks in England.

In a series of meetings, Spinks described how he picked up boys in Dresden, in Bratislava in the Czech Republic, and in Poland, where, he claimed, they cost only 10p. The undercover officer asked Spinks if he could get him a sado-masochistic video featuring boys as young as 10, and Spinks replied that he knew people in Amsterdam who could: "I know, well I knew, some people who were involved in making snuff movies and how they did it was, they only sold them in limited editions, made 10 copies or something, 10 very rich customers in America, who paid $5,000 each or something like that".

Spinks divulged no more about the video and failed to produce a copy of it. Without more evidence, Scotland Yard could not justify the expense of keeping the undercover officer or of sending officers to Amsterdam, where, in any event, they lacked police powers. They arrested Spinks in Hastings and charged him with adbucting and raping two homeless boys from the streets of London and selling one of them into a Spuistraat brothel. He was jailed for five years. But the allegation of murder would not go away. As the Guardian reported in 1997, another gay man, Edward, claimed to have seen five Amsterdam videos, each featuring the sexual torture and death of a boy. Dutch police investigated and said they could find no evidence.

Now, Terry had offered the Bristol detectives more evidence about life on Spuistraat. He explained how John Gay and Lee Tucker set themselves up as video pornographers, first taking a group of boys to an isolated farmhouse in France, and then making visits to Amsterdam to film with the boys there. And dealing with snuff movies he told how, in 1989, he had been alone in a flat which belonged to one of the key figures in the Amsterdam paedophile scene, whom he named; he had found a video and watched as it played out a murder - a boy was beaten before being castrated and cut open with a knife.

At first sight, Terry might have been describing the video Frank saw but its details differ: Frank described a video shot in a barn; Terry says his was shot in a flat. Frank described the abuse and murder of one boy; Terry says there was a second boy, who was also being abused and who was alive at the point he turned off the tape. And yet, the overlap is striking: the specific nature of the violence is identical; and Terry names the man who actually committed the killing - he is the same German whose barn was allegedly picked as a porn studio by the child porngraphers.

Terry, Frank, Edward and Spinks certainly mixed with the paedophile colony in Amsterdam in 1989/90 and all four separately claim at least one boy was killed on video. Spinks told the undercover officer that a German boy was killed; Frank says Spinks once hinted to him that a German boy named Manny had been murdered; we have confirmed from talking to boys who worked in Spuistraat at the time that a boy of that name and nationality, then 14, did disappear. Terry, however, says he thinks the victim of the video which he saw was Dutch, named Marco and probably 16.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2000/nov/27/childprotection.uk

 

Manuel Schadwald - Die Welt (1)

manuel schadwald 3.jpg

Auf den Spuren der verlorenen Kinder

1996 schockierte Kinderschänder Dutroux die Welt. Er war vermutlich Teil eines Netzwerks mit Verbindungen in höchste Kreise. Viele die mit dem Fall zu tun hatten, starben unter mysteriösen Umständen.Eine Chronik – 24. Juli 1993: Manuel Schadwald, damals zwölf Jahre alt, verschwindet an einem Samstagvormittag. Er sagte seiner Mutter, er wolle in einen Berliner Freizeitpark. Dort kam er allerdings nie an. 16. Juni 1994: Ein Mann ruft bei einer Berliner Beratungsstelle an und sagt, Manuel sei in Amsterdam gestorben. Die Berliner Polizei bittet die Kollegen dort um Hilfe. Die Beamten ermitteln einige Monate in der Rotterdamer Kinderprostitutionsszene, zunächst erfolglos. Im Juni 1995 gibt es einen neuen Hinweis. Demnach wurde Schadwald nach Holland verschleppt. Wenn Jean Lambrecks über die Kindheit seiner Tochter spricht, verschwindet die Traurigkeit aus seinem Gesicht. Dann vergisst er für wenige Momente, was Belgiens bekanntester Verbrecher Marc Dutroux seiner Eefje angetan hat. Erinnert sich, wie liebevoll sie war, als Kind schon, wie spontan, interessiert. Vor allem an Technik und Musik. Ihre Noten waren gut, das Abitur hatte sie ja gerade erst erfolgreich bestanden. Journalistin wollte sie werden, sagt Jean Lambrecks, "sie wollte über andere Menschen berichten".

Stattdessen wurde über sie berichtet, weltweit. Über das 19-jährige Mädchen, das vergewaltigt, gefesselt und betäubt worden war. Das in eine Plastikfolie eingewickelt und lebendig begraben wurde auf einem Grundstück nahe der trostlosen Stadt Charleroi in der Wallonie, Belgien. Wo man sie schließlich verscharrt unter einem Schuppen fand. Die Traurigkeit ist in das Gesicht des 67-Jährigen längst zurückgekehrt. Er erinnert sich noch genau.

Eefje hatte mit ihrer Freundin An Marchal Urlaub an der belgischen Küste in Westende gemacht. Von einem Ausflug kamen sie nicht zurück. Blieben verschwunden, trotz umfangreicher Suchaktionen. Monate, ein Jahr.

Gefoltert und vergewaltigt

376 Tage später, am 3. September 1996, wurden ihre Leichen ausgegraben. Drei Wochen, nachdem Marc Dutroux in Belgien verhaftet worden war, das Ausmaß seiner Verbrechen langsam offenbar wurde. Zwei weitere Mädchen hatte er vergraben, zwei konnte die Polizei aus einem geheimen Verlies im Keller seines Hauses befreien. Alle Mädchen waren gefoltert und vergewaltigt worden.

Am 13. August 1996 wurde Marc Dutroux festgenommen

Der Skandal um Marc Dutroux erschütterte Belgien in den Neunzigerjahren nachhaltig und sorgte weltweit für Entsetzen. Wie konnte es sein, dass ein polizeibekannter Sexualstraftäter, der wegen Entführung und Missbrauch bereits mehrere Jahre in Haft gesessen hatte, nicht früher gefasst worden war? Wie war ein Mensch zu so grausamen Verbrechen an Kindern in der Lage?

2004 fand schließlich der Prozess statt, Marc Dutroux wurde zu lebenslanger Haft verurteilt. Aber Zweifel begleiteten den Fall weiter. Vor wenigen Wochen erst veröffentlichte die belgische Zeitschrift "Le Soir Magazine" eine Umfrage zum Fall Dutroux. Das Ergebnis: 80 Prozent der Befragten sind der Meinung, dass die Wahrheit nicht bekannt sei – fast 20 Jahre nach der Verhaftung des Kindermörders. Wurde wirklich alles getan, um den Fall aufzuklären? Gibt es noch weitere Opfer? Und weitere Täter? Fragen, die lauter werden.

Hoffnung auf Aufklärung

Der Mann mit den blassblauen Augen nippt am Rotwein, während er am Kamin eines belgischen Landgasthofs in der Nähe von Hasselt von seiner langen Suche nach der Wahrheit erzählt. Das Essen rührt Jean Lambrecks kaum an. Es fällt ihm an diesem Mai-Abend sichtlich schwer, über all das zu reden. Seine Hand liegt auf der seiner neuen Lebensgefährtin Els Schreurs. Sie beschäftigt sich inzwischen fast genauso intensiv mit dem Fall wie Lambrecks. Als sie sich 2009 kennengelernt haben, war Els Schreurs sofort klar, wie viel Raum der Fall im Leben dieses Mannes einnahm, und vor allem die Hoffnung auf Aufklärung. Ihr ging es bald ähnlich.

Der Mörder von Eefje verbüßt eine lebenslange Haftstrafe im Gefängnis, aber Ruhe fanden sie nicht. "Man will uns und die Weltöffentlichkeit glauben lassen, dass Dutroux ein Einzeltäter war. Aber das stimmt nicht. Wir haben sehr viele Hinweise darauf, dass er Teil eines Netzwerkes war, das nicht nur in Belgien existierte."

Der Vater des Dutroux-Opfers Eefje Lambrecks und seine Lebensgefährtin haben jahrelang Informationen gesammelt

Jean Lambrecks und seine Lebensgefährtin tragen fast jeden Tag Informationen zu dem Dutroux-Komplex zusammen, wollen jetzt darüber sprechen. Es gebe zahlreiche Spuren, sagen sie, unter anderem nach Deutschland und in die Niederlande. "Sie werden bis heute von den Behörden vertuscht. Vermutlich deshalb, weil Geheimdienste eine Rolle spielen. Schließlich geht es um Erpressung von einflussreichen Persönlichkeiten mit Kindersex", sagt Els Schreurs.

Dutroux hatte die Kontakte ins europäische Ausland

Tatsächlich spricht auch Marc Dutroux selbst von kriminellen Strukturen mit Kontakten in hohe Gesellschaftskreise. "Ja, es gibt ein Netzwerk, das sind Schwerverbrecher. Ich stand in Verbindung mit bestimmten Leuten aus dem Netzwerk", sagte er schon beim Prozess im Jahr 2004. 2012 schrieb der Mörder einen handschriftlichen Brief an den Vater eines des anderen getöteten Mädchen, Julie Lejeune. Auch darin behauptet Dutroux, dass er "auf dem Altar der Interessen der kriminell Unantastbaren" geopfert werde, die tadellos organisiert seien und über Mittel verfügten, "die königlichen Institutionen" zu beeinflussen. Zum Fall Eefje schreibt Dutroux dort, dass vonseiten der Justiz alles unternommen worden sei, "damit die Wahrheit nur bei einem Einzeltäter gesucht wurde".

Wer diese "kriminell Unantastbaren" waren, das sagt Dutroux bis heute nicht.

Jean Lambrecks und seine Lebensgefährtin glauben dem Mörder seiner Tochter in diesem einen Punkt. "Er war eine Art Händler", sagt Els Schreurs. Dutroux habe Kontakte ins europäische Ausland. Er sei unter anderem mit einem Pädophilenring in den Niederlanden vernetzt gewesen, der für die Verschleppung von Jungen aus Polen und Deutschland in Kinderbordelle nach Rotterdam und Amsterdam verantwortlich war.

Manuel Schadwald ist einfach verschwunden

Tatsächlich war Marc Dutroux in den Niederlanden unterwegs, er ist dort mehrfach im Milieu gesehen worden, das bestätigen Augenzeugen. In Amsterdam stand er in Kontakt mit Menschen aus der Szene, verkehrte in den einschlägigen Lokalen. Und in Amsterdam verlieren sich in diesen Jahren auch die Spuren anderer Kinder. Etwa die des seit 1993 vermissten Berliners Manuel Schadwald, einer der bekanntesten Vermisstenfälle der Bundesrepublik.

Es gibt keine Leiche in diesem Fall, es gibt keinen Mörder. Der damals Zwölfjährige ist einfach verschwunden. Aber es häufen sich die Hinweise, dass es Zusammenhänge gibt zwischen dem Verschwinden Manuel Schadwalds und dem Tod des belgischen Mädchens Eefje Lambrecks.

"Es gibt Parallelen zwischen dem Tod meiner Tochter und dem Verschwinden des Berliner Jungen. In beiden Fällen ist die ganze Wahrheit bislang nicht bekannt. Irgendjemand hat ein großes Interesse daran, das Ausmaß der Verbrechen zu verschleiern", sagt Jean Lambrecks in dem Landgasthof an diesem Tag. Immer wieder wird er still. Und schaut lange in das Feuer des Kamins. Er und seine Lebensgefährtin haben sich in den vergangenen Jahren auch intensiv mit dem Fall Schadwald beschäftigt. Zeitungsartikel studiert, Zeugen getroffen, Unterlagen ausgewertet. Jean Lambrecks sagt: "Es gibt mittlerweile genügend Hinweise darauf, dass der Junge in die niederländische Kinderprostitutions-Szene verschleppt wurde."

Hinweise in Richtung Kinderprostitutions-Szene

Manuel Schadwald verschwand an einem Sonnabend, es war der 24. Juli 1993. Er wollte in ein Freizeitzentrum im Berliner Stadtteil Köpenick, sagte seine Mutter später. Doch dort kam er nie an. Manuel war ein hübscher Junge mit dunklen Haaren und zarten Gesichtszügen. Freunde beschrieben ihn als schüchtern, sensibel und introvertiert. Die Eltern hatten sich früh getrennt, Mitschüler sollen der Polizei später berichtet haben, dass sich die Mutter nicht ausreichend um ihren Sohn gekümmert und ihn manchmal über Nacht allein gelassen habe. Trotzdem war er ein guter Schüler. Er sollte nach der Grundschule auf das Gymnasium wechseln. Aber dann verschwand er.

Vier Jahre später, im November 1997, tauchte der Name des Berliner Jungen plötzlich wieder auf. Ein niederländischer Fernsehsender berichtete von dem Verdacht, dass Manuel Schadwald auf einem Kinderporno-Film zu sehen sei. Die deutschen Medien reagierten sofort, die Öffentlichkeit war schockiert.

Die Berliner Polizei dementierte schnell, dass der Junge auf dem Video Manuel Schadwald gewesen sei. Sie machte allerdings nicht öffentlich, dass es in den Jahren zuvor tatsächlich zahlreiche Hinweise an die Ermittler zu dem Verschwinden des Jungen gegeben hatte. Und dass diese Hinweise auch in die Richtung der Kinderprostitutions-Szene in den Niederlanden deuteten.

Ergebnislose Suche

So erhielt die Berliner Polizei bereits im Juni 1994 – also nicht einmal ein Jahr nach Manuel Schadwalds Verschwinden – eine wichtige Information. Damals hatte ein Mann bei der Beratungsstelle für schwule und bisexuelle Männer "Mann-O-Meter" im Berliner Stadtteil Schöneberg angerufen und folgende Nachricht hinterlassen: "Ja, ich möchte meinen Namen nicht nennen. Ich wollte nur sagen, ich hab Beweise, dass der kleine Manuel in Amsterdam, ja in Amsterdam, in Holland, dass der tot ist. Ich hab wirklich Beweise dafür." Anschließend erfolgte die Beschreibung eines Mannes. "Wenn ihr ihn habt, habt ihr auch die Leiche von Manuel in Amsterdam."

http://www.welt.de/vermischtes/article143879658/Auf-den-Spuren-der-verlorenen-Kinder.html